1

How To Start A Fire With Wet Wood Easily

With a 3-season or 4-season tent at my disposal, one may think that my camping experiences are always fanciful. Personally, however, it becomes fulfilling not when I stake my shelter near a landscape but when there’s a campfire outside.

Many old-timers may second that thought since the collected flames have various purposes for a person. You can cook with it, chat with family around it, or battle the cold weather thanks to it. The only incident that can dampen anyone’s mood is when you can’t find a dry log after raining.

What will save you now is learning how to start a fire with wet wood. I have two non-tricky methods for you in this blog, so make sure you’ll linger until the last part.

More...

Method #1

What You Need

Wood

Wood

You can find raw materials in various degrees of wetness in the wild. To make the task of starting a fire easy, however, try not to go for pieces that still float in water.


Hatchet

Hatchet

It is a sharp tool that people utilize to split small chunks of wood. In case you forgot to bring one, you may just use the ordinary kitchen knife to remove the damp layers.


Fire-starter

Fire-Starter

There are many devices that will allow you to ignite the dry wooden products into flames. Should you not want to carry a fire steel, then a box of matches will do.


What You’ll Do

One advice on how to start a fire with wet wood is to keep things simple. You only need three items for this procedure, but skills are important as well to make the following steps work.

Step 1: Gather the woods.

Step 2: Shave every damp log.

Step 3: Ignite the fire or make fuzz sticks.


Method #2

What You Need

Tinder

It is the smallest wooden bit out there. Tinder may be the driest raw product in such a situation. They can help you put the large pieces into flames.


Branches or Twigs

Branches Or Twigs

The other term for them is kindling. These are most likely attached to dead trees still but are not difficult to break off. If ever the dry ones are not available, you can split the logs to obtain multiple kindlings.


Logs

Logs

They are chunks of wood that can continue burning through the night. Looking for many barren pieces may be stressful, so feel free to carve them out of the massive materials too.


Lighter

Lighter

This fire-starting product is the easiest to find anywhere. In case you are quite experienced outdoors, however, you can also take a magnesium igniter or a fire-steel.


Petroleum Jelly and Cotton Balls (Option 1)

Petroleum Jelly

Petroleum jelly does not only soothe chapped skin during the cold season. It is a flammable alternative too that you may use in place of tinder. The choice is yours on which brand you will purchase the item from.

Cotton Balls

Meanwhile, the petroleum jelly needs a cotton ball as a medium to keep the fire burning. Just a few of the latter are necessary, and they may already be in your medicine kit.


Steel Wool (Option 2)

Steel Wool

Another candidate is steel wool – the same tool you utilize to scrub the metal cookware clean. The fine ones are especially combustible.


Non-glossy Papers (Option 3)

Papers are the final items that will allow you to start the flames. It seems necessary to specify that they should be non-glossy because you’ll wait forever for magazines to ignite. You should bring old periodicals or scraps in their place instead.


What You’ll Do

The list of essential products may be lengthy, yet learning how to start a fire with wet wood remains effortless. There are just optional materials near the end, in the event that tiny twigs are amiss. By all means, check out the process below.

Step 1: Create a fire bed.

Step 2: Start building the fire.

Step 3: Add the kindling after that.

Step 4: Improve the fire with logs.


Have These Methods Enlightened You On How To Start A Fire With Wet Wood?

You see, the proper techniques on how to start a fire with wet wood exist. The case just seems to be impossible because you need to work with damp materials. However, there are still ways to transform them into dry resources, and I aimed to show you those above.


Did either procedure help you build flames using wet wood? Let me know how you feel about the experience. Cheers!

Michael Everett
 

I am Michael, I like camping and have camped many times over the place. I’m the creator of blog rainycamping.com, through my blog I want to share my camping and travel experiences for people, there are explanations, questions and things you need.